CHEEDITHA ART GROUP INTERACTIVE

DROP US A LINE

WE SOCIALIZE

WE ANSWER

We Thought You'd

Never Ask

© 2019 by CHEEDITHA ART GROUP. Proudly created with Wix.com

OUR ARTISTS

Cheeditha Art Group is home to a passionate group of award winning artists who have grown up in the Cheeditha Community.

 

Their artwork expresses the connection they have to their country and culture and is truly unique to the Pilbara.

WENDY WARRIE

Wendy Warrie is a Yindjibarndi woman living at Cheeditha Community near Roebourne in Western Australia’s Pilbara.

She has been painting since 2001 and has previously worked with Roebourne Art Group. Wendy has exhibited in the Cossack Art Award, Colours of our Country and Ngurra Nyingu exhibitions. Wendy is now forging a career as an independent artist. While continuing to paint, Wendy is also exploring other mediums to find new ways to keep her stories and culture alive.

Wendy’s art focuses on the creation story of the Yindjibarndi people. The Barrimirndi (Rainbow Serpent), from the time when the land was soft, and his journey inland formed the Fortescue River and made the country hard. Flooding rivers feature in Wendy’s artwork, the rough water where the tide comes in and meets the flooded rivers.

KAYE WARRIE

Kaye Warrie is a Yindjibarndi woman living in Cheeditha Community near Roebourne in Western Australia’s Pilbara.

Kaye has been painting since the early 2000s. Before the Cheeditha Art Group was established, she worked with other artists’ cooperatives, including Roebourne Art Group (RAG). With RAG, Kaye exhibited in the Cossack Art Award, Colours of our Country and Ngurra Nyingu.

Kaye is now establishing an independent art career. While continuing her painting, Kaye is also exploring other mediums, finding new ways to keep her stories and culture alive.

Her artworks feature the Seven Sisters dreamtime story (represented by the Pleiades star cluster), the land and the colours she sees in her Country. The Thurlawirdingbirding (Sturt Pea) often features in her work, drawing on the strong childhood memories of her mother giving the children the flowers to suck out the sweetness.

Kaye’s mother used to take them out on Country, showing and telling the stories of the marks on the land.

JOYLENE WARRIE

Joylene Warrie is a Yindjibarndi woman who began her painting career at Bujee Nhoorr-Pu art group at nearby Cossack.

Bujee Nhoorr-Pu was established by the Cheeditha Group as an art and interpretive tourism activity. This social enterprise started in Cheeditha before moving to the historic Galbraith Building in Cossack and working with a local tourist operator who was running boat tours out to Jarman Island.

Joylene’s paintings are based on her country and culture. She paints the Millstream delta in spring when the country comes alive. She works with lots of strong colour in order to show the amazing shades and tints of her country.

SHARON WARRIE

Sharon is a Kariyarra and Yindjibarndi woman. She has been painting since the Bujee Nhoorr-Pu art group were painting at Cossack.

Sharon paints dreamtime stories about the land and her Country. She focuses on Millstream and the waterholes along the Fortescue River. The Barrimirndi story, the story of how the Rainbow Serpent created the Fortescue River, is an important story for the Yindjibarndi people and it often appears in Sharon’s paintings and artworks.

Sharon’s work also features the Yindjibarndi brand symbol and her strong ochre colours reflect those colours used for body painting for ceremonies.

MAISIE INDJI

Maisie Indji is a Yindjibarndi woman, who was born and grew up in Roebourne and lives at Cheeditha Community.

She has only recently started to paint because she has worked all her life and has not had the time. Maisie is now working part time, so now has the time to learn about and enjoy her painting.

Maisie’s paintings are about the ocean and the rivers because she loves the colours.

MICHAEL HICKS

Michael Hicks is a Ngarluma and Guruma artist living at Cheeditha. He has tried painting in the past but has now started making art glass in the community studio.

Michael’s art tells the story of artefacts left after hunting. Michael says: “In the old days, people would use sharpened stones to skin the kangaroo, they have a feed then move on…the stones stay”.